Saturday, August 19, 2017

ECOSOC Resolutions

ECOSOC ResolutionsDateResolutions
2008
Provision of international assistance to the most affected States neighbouring Afghanistan24 July 20082008/27
2007
Support to the counter-narcotic measures and programmes of Afghanistan25 July 20072007/11
2006
Situation of women and girls in Afghanistan25 July 20062006/7
Support for the National Drug Control Strategy of the Government of Afghanistan27 July 20062006/32
2005
Situation of women and girls in Afghanistan21 July 20052005/8
Providing support to Afghanistan with a view to ensuring effective implementation of its Counter-Narcotic Implementation Plan22 July 20052005/24
2004
Social and human rights questions: Advancement of women (14(a))21 July 20042004/10
Providing support to the Government of Afghanistan in its efforts to eliminate illicit opium and foster stability and security in the region21 July 20042004/37
2003
Social and human rights questions: Advancement of women (14(a))22 July 20032003/43
2002
Situation of women and girls in Afghanistan24 July 20022002/4
2001
Discrimination against women and girls in Afghanistan24 July 20012001/3

Secretary General Reports on Afghanistan

Secretary General Reports
TopicResolution DateResolution NO.
2017
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security3 March 2017S/2017/189
2016
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security13 December 2016S/2016/1049
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security7 September 2016S/2016/768
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security10 June 2016S/2016/532
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security7 March 2016S/2016/218
2015
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security10 December 2015S/2015/942
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security1 September 2015S/2015/684
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security10 June 2015S/2015/422
Report on children and armed conflict in Afghanistan (Reporting period: 1 September 2010 to 31 December 2014) 15 May 2015S/2015/336
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security27 February 2015S/2015/151
2014
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for
international peace and security
9 December 2014S/2014/876
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for
international peace and security
9 September 2014S/2014/656
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for
international peace and security
18 June 2014S/2014/420
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for
international peace and security
7 March 2014S/2014/163
2013
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security6 December 2013S/2013/721
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security6 September 2013S/2013/535
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security 13 June 2013S/2013/350
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security 5 March 2013S/2013/133
2012
Situation in Afghanistan and its implication for international peace and security6/December/2012S/2012/907
Situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security13/September/2012S/2012/703
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implication for international peace and securityJune/20/2012S/2012/462
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and securityMarch/05/2012S/2012/133
2011
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and securitySep/21/2011S/2011/590
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and securityJune/23/2011S/2011/381
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and securityMarch/09/2011S/2011/120
Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict
in Afghanistan
Feb/03/2011S/2011/55
2010
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for
international peace and security
Sep/14/2010S/2010/463
Report of the Secretary-General pursuant on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and securityJun/16/2010S/2010/318
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for
international peace and security
Mar/10/2010S/2010/127
2009
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security28/Dec/09 S/2009/674
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security9/22/2009S/2009/475
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security6/23/2009S/2009/323
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security3/10/2009S/2009/135
2008
Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in Afghanistan10/Nov/08S/2008/695
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security23/Sep/08S/2008/617
Special report of the Secretary-General pursuant to Security Council resolution 1806 (2008) on the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan3-Jul-08S/2008/434
Report of the Secretary-General on situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security6-Mar-08S/2008/159
2007
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security21-Sep-07S/2007/555
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security15-Mar-07S/2007/152
2006
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security - Emergency international assistance for peace, normalcy and reconstruction of war-stricken Afghanistan7-Mar-06S/2006/145
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for peace and security11-Sep-06S/2006/727
2005
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security; Emergency international assistance for peace, normalcy and reconstruction of war-stricken Afghanistan18-Mar-05S/2005/183
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security; Emergency international assistance for peace, normalcy and reconstruction of war-stricken Afghanistan12-Aug-05S/2005/525
2004
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security19-Mar-04S/2004/230-A/58/742
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security12-Aug-04S/2004/634
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security - Emergency international assistance for peace, normalcy and reconstruction of war-stricken Afghanistan26-Nov-04S/2004/925
2003
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security18-Mar-03S/2003/333
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security23-Jul-03S/2003/754 S/2003/754/CORR.1
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security30-Dec-03S/2003/1212
2002
The situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security18-Mar-02S/2002/278
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security11-Jul-02A/56/1000-S
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security21-Oct-02S/2002/1173 A/57/487
2001
Report of the Secretary-General on the humanitarian implications of the measures imposed by Security Council resolution 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000) on Afghanistan20-Mar-01S/2001/241
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security19-Apr-01S/2001/384
Report of the Secretary-General on the humanitarian implications of the measures imposed by Security Council resolution 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000) on Afghanistan13-Jul-01S/2001/695
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security14-Aug-01S/2001/789
Report of the Secretary-General on the humanitarian implications of the measures imposed by Security Council resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000) on the territory of Afghanistan under Taliban control19-Nov-01S/2001/1086
Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in Afghanistan and its implications for international peace and security6-Dec-01S/2001/1157
Report of the Secretary-General on the humanitarian implications of the measures imposed by Security Council resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1333 (2000) on the territory of Afghanistan under Taliban control18-Dec-01S/2001/1215

Security Council Debate on The Situation in Afghanistan

Statement By H.E. Dr. Zahir Tanin

Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

at the Security Council Debate on The Situation in Afghanistan

New York

Madame President,

Excellencies,

Ladies and gentlemen,

First please allow me to congratulate you on your Presidency of the Council for the month of December. I would like to also thank the Secretary General for his most recent report, and Special Representative Staffan De Mistura for his informative briefing and dedicated leadership of UNAMA.

Madame President,

We have arrived at the end of an eventful and historic year in Afghanistan. The year began with the London Conference, followed by the Peace Jirga, Kabul Conference, the second parliamentary elections and NATO Summit in Lisbon. This year, while we have made momentous strides towards defining and strengthening our relationship with international partners, we sought to re-engage the Afghan people in all efforts to bring peace and security to our country, enhance collaboration with regional partners and reach out to the armed opposition.

Madame President,

The Lisbon Summit was a milestone towards reassuring an enduring partnership between Afghanistan and NATO. Among the key outcomes of the conference, we adopted the framework of transition to greater Afghan leadership over the next four years, through a province by province approach.  High level mechanisms which include key national and international stakeholders have been established to oversee the transition process.  The new year will mark the launch of the transition process.  Practical preparations are underway to that end. The commitment of our international partners to sustained and expedited recruitment, training and resourcing of the Afghan national army and police, will constitute a key component of their redefined mission.

The Lisbon Summit sent three key messages: first – a message to the Afghan people that the international community will not leave Afghanistan and will remain engaged with the Afghan people for the long haul; second – a message to terrorists and extremists that they will fail in their efforts to take Afghanistan back to the days of tyranny and oppression; and third – a message for the region that cooperation is vital; our neighbors have a role and a stake in the security and the stability of Afghanistan.

Madame President,

Improving security, which remains a top priority of the Afghan government, has been a key focus of the Afghan and ISAF forces. Despite isolated incidents of attacks and suicide bombings by the Taliban and other extremists, overall security has improved. The latest assessments show that the ISAF and Afghan forces for the first time in the last two years have begun to regain the military initiative.  This is particularly the case in southern provinces which once saw high levels of insecurity. The zone of security has expanded, with Afghan security forces exerting greater presence and control in areas previously held by enemy combatants.

Such success has a direct effect on public perception. In the Afghan villages, specifically in the south, people acknowledge the progress being made, and have begun to engage with local authorities and the Afghan and international forces. Consolidating the support of the local populace is vital for a successful international engagement in Afghanistan. In this context, emphasis must continue to be placed on ensuring basic services for Afghans as well as avoiding civilian casualties during military operations. We welcome increased measures of coordination among international forces and the review of tactics in order to prevent harm to local communities.

Madame President,

It is now clear to all that an end to the sanctuaries in the region is crucial to the success of the international campaign to stabilize the region and eliminate the threat of terrorism. We cannot underestimate the need to address sanctuaries and safe-havens in the region which operate as the “command and control headquarters” for terrorists and extremists. Without progress on this front, all our efforts will go in vain.

Madame President,

Our recent parliamentary elections, the second since the fall of the Taliban in 2001, reaffirmed the commitment of the Afghan people to the democratic process.  Millions of Afghans braved security threats and cast their votes to elect members of the National Assembly.  Nobody expected a perfect election process. The circumstances under which the elections took place gave way to irregularities including the closing of polling stations and the discounting of many votes by election bodies.  As it has been announced, the new parliament will be inaugurated in late January.

Madame President,

The Afghan government continues to focus on enhancing our relationships with our neighbors in the region.  Effective regional cooperation is indispensable for solving the many challenges facing Afghanistan and countries in the region. We maintain high level communications with the government of Pakistan for wider cooperation in the fight against terrorism and for promoting peace, stability and economic development in both our countries.

We continue to strengthen cooperation with all neighbors in the region.  Afghanistan holds a unique standing, in which it is increasingly positioned to serve as an economic hub or an Asian Roundabout in the greater region.

A historical event occurred on the 11th of December in Ashqabat during the summit meeting of Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India (TAPI) with the signing of the important agreements for the implementation of the gas pipeline project. The summit was a key step for the realization of the regional framework of cooperation in providing energy and energy security.

Madame President,

With the beginning of the transition process, reintegration and reconciliation will be pursued as a matter of high priority in Afghanistan. In fact, reconciliation is becoming an essential political dimension of the transition strategy.  For reconciliation to work, the Taliban must be ready to engage sincerely in peace talks; but for reconciliation to succeed, the Taliban must put down their arms, renounce violence and choose the path of peace. Success lies in maintaining our key asset, Afghan leadership and ownership of the reconciliation process.  There is also a role for others – the International Community, the region, and the United Nations- to support the Afghan government to succeed in its reconciliation efforts.

Madame President,

The Afghan government has worked diligently toward implementing our goals in security, development, and governance. Recent progress in all three of these areas is outlined in the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)’s Progress Report on the Afghanistan National Development Strategy,  released in November.

The results overall were highly encouraging, particularly in the areas of governance, national transparency and accountability. In the first 100 days since the Kabul Conference, 95% of planned activities were completed for creating an efficient and effective government, including recruitment of 24 new district governors and the drafting of new anti-corruption laws. The Afghan government will continue to pursue effective and timely implementation of all national priority strategies.  In this regard, we are monitoring progress and challenges in relation to all programs through the recently established monitoring mechanism.

Madame President,

The most important assessment of the situation in Afghanistan comes from Afghans themselves. Public opinion in Afghanistan, according to recent surveys, reflects that the majority of Afghans continue to positively assess their government, support national reconciliation efforts, and most importantly, they share the perspective that the country is heading in the right direction.

Madame President,

As transition begins, there are clear roles for both the Afghan government and for the International Community. In the four years ahead, the measure of success will be determined by the strength of the partnership of the international community and Afghanistan.  The focus of this partnership must be on building the Afghan government’s capacity to take responsibility.  The transition process goes far beyond the training of Afghan security forces; our partnership must actively address not only security, but development and governance.

Madame President,

A stable and prosperous Afghanistan requires unity of understanding, unity of efforts, and unity of action.  And I assure you that we will spare no effort to do our part.

I thank you.

Permanent Mission of Afghanistan