Saturday, July 30, 2016

Visit of H.E. Dilber Nazari, Minister of Women’s Affairs

H.E. Dilber Nazari, Minister of Women’s Affairs is in New York to participate in the N-Peace award ceremony, which is a multi country initiative managed by UNDP to further the women, peace and security agenda, and to promote broader conflict prevention and peace building work in Asia. She visited the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations on Oct 22 and addressed the staff of the Mission and the Consulate.

H.E. Dilber Nazari, Minister of Women’s Affairs visited the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations on Oct 22 and addressed the staff of the Mission and the Consulate.

H.E. Dilber Nazari, Minister of Women’s Affairs visited the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations on Oct 22 and addressed the staff of the Mission and the Consulate.

Speaking at length about the achievements of Afghan women in the past fourteen years, Minister Nazari gave special emphasis to the participation of women in the public sphere—she said how there have been significant changes in women’s participation in education, workforce, and political life. President Ashraf Ghani has promised seven ambassadorial level positions for women; currently four ministries and two governorships are held by women. The presence of women, though in small numbers, in senior administrative positions herald a new era of women’s empowerment in Afghanistan.

Minister Nazari spoke of the 100 day plan for her ministry which focused on increasing capacity for women’s institutions in urban as well as rural Afghanistan. A review of the ministry found that 80 positions were vacant, which were filled by recruiting the best talents in a competitive manner. Improving women’s access to justice and legal aid in case of duress was another significant facet of the 100 day plan. Developing strategies for implementation of a law prohibiting violence against women, which was recently approved by the cabinet, is also a priority for the Ministry.

H.E. Dilber Nazari, Minister of Women’s Affairs visited the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations on Oct 22 and addressed the staff of the Mission and the Consulate.

H.E. Dilber Nazari, Minister of Women’s Affairs visited the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations on Oct 22 and addressed the staff of the Mission and the Consulate.

Despite the significant progress in women’s empowerment and social status, multiple challenges persist for women in Afghanistan. Most of the development dividends and public participation is still concentrated in urban areas; life for rural Afghan women hasn’t changed much. Persistent security threats act as significant impediments to securing and strengthening women’s rights in the country. During the recent Taliban attack on Kunduz, Minister Nazari elaborated how she had to evacuate female staff and residents of women’s protection centers on a very short notice and under tremendous security challenges. She mentioned that Kunduz is safe and secure now; about 8,000 families have returned and the city is slowly getting back to normal life. She also spoke about the need for continued support from the international community and how it is absolutely essential to guarantee women their rightful position in society.

The next 100 days plan focuses on educating the population, especially in the remote rural areas, about rights of women. The focus would be on engaging men in the process and making them equal stakeholders in creating a just society based on gender equity. Support for widows and destitute women would also be a significant aspect of the next 100 days plan by the Ministry.

Minister Nazari’s visit was really beneficial to get a glimpse of the progress made by Afghan women in the past decade and also realistically gage the challenges ahead and strategies to counter them

Election of Afghanistan as a Member of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)

Press Release: Oct 21, 2015

On October 21, 2015 Afghanistan was elected as a member of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) for a term of three years (January 2016 to 2018) by a clear majority of votes by the United Nations General Assembly.

One of the six main organs of the United Nations, ECOSOC is the principal UN organ for the discussion and coordination of international economic and social issues and for formulating policy recommendations for Member States and the UN system. It is the main body for coordination, policy review, policy dialogue and recommendations on economic, social and environmental issues, as well as for implementation of the internationally agreed development goals.

Ambassador Mahmoud Saikal, the designated Permanent Representative of Afghanistan to the United Nations was present at the event. Talking about Afghanistan’s previous candidature efforts, he said: “Afghanistan had introduced its candidature in 2009 for a term from 2012-2014 but deferred for the term 2016-2018 to preserve solidarity of the Asia-Pacific Group and avoid internal competition. This year, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Iraq, and Viet Nam were endorsed by the Asia Pacific group and had the Group’s full support. Afghanistan’s membership would be a great opportunity to contribute and join the collective global efforts in elimination of poverty and realization of sustainable development goals within the framework of ECOSOC.” While talking about how it was time to focus on sustaining the development gains in Afghanistan, he said “Our membership in ECOSOC and the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda will provide us with an excellent opportunity to advance Afghanistan’s national development strategy in a sustainable way”

18 new members from five regional groups, namely Algeria, Nigeria, Rwanda, Somalia, and South Africa from African Group, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Iraq and Viet Nam from Asia-Pacific Group, Czech Republic and Republic of Moldova from Eastern European Group, Chile, Guyana, and Peru from Latin American and Caribbean States Group, and Australia, Belgium, Italy and United Sates of America from Western European and other States Group were also elected.

Afghanistan was a member of ECOSOC from 1959-1961 and then from 1976-1978. This is the third time Afghanistan will serve as a member of ECOSOC.

Statement by H.E. Mahmoud Saikal Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations At the Fourth Committee Agenda item 51 (Assistance in Mine Action)

Mr. Chairman, Distinguished Delegates,

Let me join other delegations in congratulating you on your assumption of Chairmanship of the forth committee of the 70th session of the UNGA and your bureau members for their well-deserved elections. We look forward to working closely with you and assure you of our full support and cooperation throughout the deliberations of issues concerned to this committee.

Afghanistan has been struggling with the problem of landmines, explosive remnants of war (ERW), including improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and their devastating consequences for more than three decades. Abandoned landmines and explosive ordnances, vestiges of the prolonged conflict in the country, continue to pose a great threat by jeopardizing the security and development of Afghanistan and its people. Although significant progress has been achieved in demining activities, Afghanistan remains one of the most heavily mined countries in the world.

Mr. Chairman,

Approximately, half a million Afghan civilians live within five hundred meters of landmine contaminated areas. An average of 33 civilians have been injured or killed each month so far in 2015. 1,612 communities remain affected in 258 districts across the country. Over 107 square kilometres of minefields impede upon national infrastructure projects, such as, highway and road networks, airports, transmission lines, new settlements etc., delaying implementation until clearance. The country remains littered with hazardous explosive devices in multiple areas, including those where conflict has long ceased. Innocent civilians, including a large proportion of women and children, bear the highest risk of being killed or injured by these mines. Not only it is detrimental to stability and post-conflict development, landmines and other explosive remnants of war impede significant socio-economic development, required for basic sustenance in a war torn economy. More than eighty percent of the landmine and ERW contaminated areas obstruct agricultural and grazing spaces, thereby posing a tremendous challenge in a country where livelihoods of majority of people are concentrated around agriculture and livestock.  Mines and ERWs obstruct access to basic services, facilities and infrastructure and create severe challenges to use land for schools, crops, and other productive activities.

The presence of Improvised Explosive Devices or IEDs is another imperative threat to civilian life. Indiscriminate use of IEDs is a common tactic amongst the Taliban and other terrorist groups. Last year alone, approximately three thousand civilians were victims of injuries caused by IEDs in Afghanistan.

Mr. Chairman,

The Mine Action Programme of Afghanistan has cleared nearly 78.5 percent of known “legacy” contamination – the mines and ERWs which resulted from the pre-2001 conflict. The remaining 21.5 percent includes 4,363 identifiable mine and battlefield hazards covering a total area of 557.6 square kilometres.  In December of 2012, Afghanistan submitted a request to the States Parties of the Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treaty to extend the deadline. All antipersonnel mines would be removed from Afghan territory in ten years.  As part of the extension request, Afghanistan submitted a ten-year work plan that will eliminate mines by 2023 if, and only if further mining stops.

I would like to turn now to the resolution on assistance in mine action which was facilitated by Poland. As a mine affected country, we highly appreciate the resolution on Assistance in Mine action and its role in reaffirming the normative framework for the humanitarian mine action activities carried out by the UN system. We are pleased the resolution continues to support the work of United Nations Mine Action Service and takes note of the elaboration and adoption of UN mine action strategy for the years 2013-2018.

Afghanistan fully supports the work and appreciates the enormous contribution of the UN and civil society in progressing mine action. We look forward to continuing to work with Member States, UN agencies, implementing partners, civil society and other donors to achieve our collective goal of a mine free world. I would also like to express my government’s sincere appreciation for the victim assistance project generously funded by USAID in Afghanistan.  This is a thirty million dollar project that will be implemented over the next three years with the aim to provide assistance to the victims of mines, ERWs and IEDs.

Continued support of the international community and sustained financial support are required to help Afghanistan meet the 2023 deadline and provide the Afghans a secure and stable, mine-free future.

Thank you.